16 7 / 2014

noahberkley:

Strikingly bizarre concept art by Chris Foss for Alejandro Jodorowsky’s abandoned Dune adaptation

(via mattfractionblog)

16 7 / 2014

june2734:

Life With Archie #36 Covers. Goodbye Archie Andrews.

14 7 / 2014

14 7 / 2014

fatgirlinohio:

Mark Harris is the best about constantly pointing out gender (and minority) discrimination in the language of film/TV criticism.

(via wilwheaton)

12 7 / 2014

amypunx:

fuuuuck this makes me sad and happy at the same time

amypunx:

fuuuuck this makes me sad and happy at the same time

(Source: rockrockrocknrollhighschool, via retrogasm)

12 7 / 2014

Fancy! #Dodgers #LA #LosAngeles #GoDodger #LosAngelesDodgers

Fancy! #Dodgers #LA #LosAngeles #GoDodger #LosAngelesDodgers

12 7 / 2014

archiemcphee:

Last year we first featured the work of NY and LA-based Lifestyle Pet Photographer Seth Casteel, who created an awesome series of high-speed underwater photos of dogs diving in to fetch their tennis balls. Casteel is back with what might be an even more delightful series, because this time he’s photographed puppies in the middle of exuberant underwater lunges.

His latest book, entitled Underwater Puppies, is due to be released in September 2014. For now you can still order copies of his first book, Underwater Dogs, via Amazon.

Visit Seth Casteel’s Facebook page and Instagram account for many more of his hilarious underwater dog photos, prints of which are available via Zenfolio.

[via Twisted Sifter]

12 7 / 2014

homovikings:

Laverne Cox as Jennifer Walters / She Hulk is the only fancast I accept anymore

Yes!

12 7 / 2014

”It took me 10 years to be ready for this. I’ve got a pretty good foundation of friends and family that will always keep me grounded no matter what. But I don’t think I would have been ready for it 10 years ago. So I’m really happy with the way it worked out. You need to learn how to do this. You need to learn how to keep your cool, learn how to be a leader on set, learn how to act. F—-, I still know I’ve got a ton to learn. It’s all a learning experience. I’m going to school every day.” [x]

So happy for him!

(Source: starlorrd, via comixology)

11 7 / 2014

comicsalliance:

MS. MARVEL: ALIENATION, EXHILARATION, AND THE BEATING HEART OF SUPERHERO COMICS
By Juliet Kahn
As the daughter of two very different cultures, as someone who grew up in a Spanish-speaking home, and as someone who has always turned to books to explain the vagaries of life, I’ve grown used to fiction aimed at “ethnic” young adults. It wears its consciousness on its sleeve, and ranges from the excellent — everything by the recently deceased Walter Dean Myers — to the execrable. The latter is didactic, joyless, and feels less written than assembled by a band of preening academics. There is no truth at the heart of it, only a clinical estimation of “otherness” that, in addition to feeling false, is nearly always boring. Comics have fallen into this trap for decades, though the character of color in question is almost never the protagonist. One weak swipe at relevance, usually in the introductory issue, is all we get before they slowly, implacably, fade into the background.

I was excited for Ms. Marvel from the moment it was announced. I reblogged it, retweeted it, called my mother about it, chatted it up at my local comic shop. But secretly, I was more than a little certain that it would suck in all the usual ways. Sure, the Jamie McKelvie cover was splashy, and sure, I was hearing good things about series writer G. Willow Wilson and artist Adrian Alphona. But I was girded for — and expected — twenty or so lackluster issues before cancellation.

The first issue came out, and it was good. Really good. It was bright and fun and electric with personality in every way a comic can be, from its color palette to its ending splash. Still, though, I was unconvinced — fantastic first issues have given way to mediocrity before.

But the second issue was great. And the third. And the fourth. And with the fifth issue and the first arc completed, I feel that I can finally let out the breath I’ve been holding and say that Ms. Marvel is truly wonderful work.
READ MORE

comicsalliance:

MS. MARVEL: ALIENATION, EXHILARATION, AND THE BEATING HEART OF SUPERHERO COMICS

By Juliet Kahn

As the daughter of two very different cultures, as someone who grew up in a Spanish-speaking home, and as someone who has always turned to books to explain the vagaries of life, I’ve grown used to fiction aimed at “ethnic” young adults. It wears its consciousness on its sleeve, and ranges from the excellent — everything by the recently deceased Walter Dean Myers — to the execrable. The latter is didactic, joyless, and feels less written than assembled by a band of preening academics. There is no truth at the heart of it, only a clinical estimation of “otherness” that, in addition to feeling false, is nearly always boring. Comics have fallen into this trap for decades, though the character of color in question is almost never the protagonist. One weak swipe at relevance, usually in the introductory issue, is all we get before they slowly, implacably, fade into the background.

I was excited for Ms. Marvel from the moment it was announced. I reblogged it, retweeted it, called my mother about it, chatted it up at my local comic shop. But secretly, I was more than a little certain that it would suck in all the usual ways. Sure, the Jamie McKelvie cover was splashy, and sure, I was hearing good things about series writer G. Willow Wilson and artist Adrian Alphona. But I was girded for — and expected — twenty or so lackluster issues before cancellation.

The first issue came out, and it was good. Really good. It was bright and fun and electric with personality in every way a comic can be, from its color palette to its ending splash. Still, though, I was unconvinced — fantastic first issues have given way to mediocrity before.

But the second issue was great. And the third. And the fourth. And with the fifth issue and the first arc completed, I feel that I can finally let out the breath I’ve been holding and say that Ms. Marvel is truly wonderful work.

READ MORE

(via comixology)